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Coconut Oil – Duct Tape for the Broken Metabolism

Coconut oil can be found in just about every grocery store, health food store and coffee shop near you.  It was made popular in the last few years by the highly advertised Bullet Proof Coffee claims of health and taste over the last few years.  But in the last few days, the news outlets through video and print have made it clear that the American Heart Association (AHA) isn’t happy with our use of this “duct tape for one’s metabolism.” The AHA has long been a proponent of education against activities increasing the risk of heart disease.  Since 1961 the AHA has decried the use of saturated fat, based on their support of Ansel Key’s diet heart hypothesis, and leading to over 60 years of preaching against the use of saturated fats from the pulpits of science.  The claim is that 85% of coconut oil is saturated fat (this is the fat deemed “evil” by those “disciples of the low-fat cloth”).   Yes, coconut oil is predominantly a saturated fat.  And approximately 75% of that is medium chain triglycerides, the form that converts most efficiently into ketones, for those of us using ketogenic nutritional approaches to health.  But is coconut oil really bad for your heart health?

Those of us using ketogenic diets know that LDL-C will commonly rise with increased saturated fat intake.  And, we’ve know this for over twenty years. This is to be expected, because LDL-C is really comprised of three different LDL sub-particles (big fluffy, medium, and small dense).  We’ve known for the last twenty years that increased saturated fat actually causes a shift in these particles to bigger “fluffier” particles.  We also know that it’s the small dense LDL particles are the atherogenic/inflammatory particles participating in the formation of vascular disease (arterial blockage) and their presence in the blood is directly correlated with the level of triglyceride, and that the big “fluffy” particles actually reduce the risk of vascular disease. Those of us following ketogenic lifestyles and treating disease with these protocols also know that triglycerides levels are increased directly by increasing levels of insulin.

The 2015 British Medical Journal published a study reviewing the relevant 19 peer reviewed medical articles that included over 68,000 participants.  This review showed that there is no association of high LDL-C (a calculated value of all the LDL sub-particles) with mortality (meaning that an elevated LDL-C does not lead to an increased risk of death from heart disease).  In stark contrast to this landmark review, The American Heart Association’s Presidential Advisory published this week in the June 20, 2017 issue of Circulation states that saturated fat is the cause of increased LDL-C and elevated LDL-C is associated with an increase in death by cardiovascular disease.  This boldfaced claim is based on a single small 4 year (2009-2013) literature review completed by the World Health Organization with a whopping 2353 participants, most of these studies only lasting 3-5 weeks (not nearly long enough to see fully effective cholesterol changes) and none of which had any focus on carbohydrate intake, insulin levels or LDL sub-particle measurement.  From this singular study, the AHA concludes that elevated LDL-C is an indicator of increased cardiovascular mortality.  That’s the equivalent of saying, “you know cars drive on the roads and cause pot holes, so we should all STOP driving cars because it is causing our freeway system to have increased pot holes.”

You can’t extrapolate mortality risk based on a single small study that doesn’t actually identify correlation or causation.  But the AHA did exactly that in 1961, and they are trying to do it again today.   The MR-FIT study, largest study ever completed, is incessantly quoted as the study that demonstrates reduction in cholesterol leads to reduction in cardiovascular disease, but this trial was actually a failure and did not demonstrate improved risk by lowering cholesterol.  In fact, the Director of the study, Dr. William Castelli actually stated, “. . . the more saturated fat one ate, the more cholesterol one ate, the more calories one ate, the lower people’s serum cholesterol…”

“We found that the people who ate the most cholesterol, ate the most saturated fat, ate the most calories weighed the least and were the most physically active,” he said.

Isn’t that interesting?

So, is coconut oil, or any other food high in saturated fat to blame?  Absolutely not!  There is no solid evidence to support these facts and there hasn’t been in over 65 years.   In fact, clinically, I find that the addition of coconut oil lowers triglycerides, decreases appetite, improves energy, improves skin tone, and plays a huge role in shifting the Omega 3/6 ratios to a more normal 2:1 level.

Is coconut oil, or any other food high in saturated fat to blame? Absolutely not! There is no solid evidence to support these facts and there hasn't been in over 65 years. #docmusclesClick To Tweet

So, how does coconut oil help the broken metabolism?  The majority of people I see in my office have insulin resistance to some degree.  Insulin resistance is an over production of insulin in response to any form of carbohydrate or starch.  Increasing your saturated fat, does two things.  It provides a fantastic form of fuel, one your body can use very easily.  And second, it will decrease your craving for starches and carbohydrates, naturally decreasing production of insulin and helping to improve insulin resistance over time.

If you want to learn more about using fat and improving insulin resistance, see my previous blog post here.

You can learn more about how our acceptance of bad science has lead to an obesity and diabetes epidemic in our country over the last 65 years by reading these books below:

 

SculpSure Non-Invasive Fat Reduction

I am excited to announce that we just added the SculpSure Laser to our treatment offerings at Nally Family Practice.   Many of my patient’s have very successfully lost weight with a ketogenic lifestyle; and I am still a strong advocate of a ketogenic lifestyle for maintenance of health, weight and over-all wellness.

After years of carrying extra weight, a number of my patients still struggle with that last stubborn problem areas like the belly and love handles.  I’ve been waiting for over 15 years for technology to catch up to treat theses areas, . . .  and now it has. 20160811-CYN-9

Introducing SculptSure, the non-invasive fat reduction laser that can customize fat reduction in the problem spots.

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Call our office today to schedule your consultation with Dr. Nally and his staff to find out if SculpSure is right for you!

(623) 584-7805

KetoTalk LIVE on the Boat: Episode #69

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Listen in to our live audience recording of KetoTalk Episode #69 while cruising around Alaska!

Questions You Can Find Answers to On This Podcast:

– Can your fasting blood sugar creep up if you’ve been low carb for a long time?
– What combination of electrolytes do you need to prevent leg cramps while keto?
– Should I use a keto diet to treat an immunosuppressed system?
– How does a keto diet effect someone with low stomach acid levels?
– Does plaque leave your arteries when you go keto, or do you have it forever?
– What is the best time to test blood sugar?
– Why does some bacon have sugar, and should I be eating it? What about nitrates?
– How do you account for the variations in home glucose meter readings?
– Why are most artificial sweeteners not a good idea?
– Can keto help Reynaud’s Syndrome?
– Is there a role for energy balance on keto specifically after hormones have been normalized?
– Why do some people get keto rash?
– Is my raised blood sugar levels telling me that I am still healing?
– Stalled weight loss after gastric band
– Why do you sometimes go out of ketosis after exercise?
– What is the difference in using MCT oil vs coconut oil?
– What is the proper timing of supplementing with bone broth and other electrolytes?
– Are food sensitivity tests a good idea?
– If calories don’t matter, why do things like the rice diet work?
– Why do I wake up hungry in the middle of the night?

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Dr. Nally’s KetoLiving Muti-Vitamin Formulation

Dietary Counseling Tantrums

I am a Family Practice Physician.  I spent eleven years of my life training to become a physician certified in Family Medicine.  But, I found this wasn’t enough.  I struggled to treat the “diseases of civilization” that arise from society, our Western diet and lifestyle.

I, also, specialize in dietary weight/obesity management and low-carbohydrate/ketogenic diets.  I actually spent an additional three years obtaining specialized training and board certification in this field.   When you add all the training and my years of experience in practice together, I’ve spent over 25 years perfecting this art of medicine.

Because of this training, I have been very blessed that people from all over the world travel to Surprise, Arizona, to see me for weight management, dietary advise, and counseling on the diseases of civilization.  I’ve been amazed that simple changes in diet halt and reverse obesity, arthritis, diabetes, cholesterol, high blood pressure, etc.  The list goes on and on …

But I find a disturbing mindset pervasive through the community and the nation:

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After listening to an number of people get angry over this issue in the last few weeks, I began wondering to myself…

“Who ties your shoelaces for you?”

Dear Grammar Police . . .

Dear Grammar Police,

After 15 years of blogging, writing and podcasting, I feel it is time to take a stand. It never ceases to amaze me how prosaic, pedestrian, unimaginative people can persistently pontificate about classical grammatical structure as though it’s neurosurgery or rocket science. I assume you, grammar police, are the same people who hated Picasso, because he couldn’t keep the paint inside the lines and the colors never matched the numbers. You must be related to those who imprisoned Galileo for heresy, implying that the Earth was not the center of the universe. It is one thing to enjoy good prose, but it is completely different to publicly deride someone about misplacing a coma or misspelling a word.

Most of my posts and articles are written after a very long day. I do all my own writing. No one pays me for it. It is done because I care. In my effort to provide a principle and a concept that will dramatically change one’s health, I may miss the misspelled word or inappropriately conjugate my verb.

I will admit that I’ve had my fair share of “its” instead of “it’s,” and I’ve spelled many a word wrong at 12:32 AM. But, I’m not performing surgery. (I’ll admit that I’ve never left the “i” out of public before.) The fact that I actually publish loads of FREE articles and videos after working 16-18 hour days, taking care of thousands of patients, should be enough to receive a simple “Thank you, Dr. Nally.”

But, NO! The grammar police attack and tell me on a regular basis how terrible I am because I spelled supplement with an “a” or my i-phone’s auto correct changed “there” to “their.”

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It seams that I usually get my point across about health and diet, because the inspectors of the written word tell me that my grammar or punctuation or spelling needs to align with the clearly understood point I attempted to write. In fact, they will print the information off and bring it to my office… with corrections in red pen, mind you.

I realize that in the pompous minds of the “Word Nazi’s” those of us who misspell or incorrectly conjugate our written prose lose credibility. Do I need your pedantic pompous credibility? Not really. These are often the same people who won’t take my medical advise, even though their version of a vegan diet is causing progressive obesity, hypertension and vascular disease.

You don’t own the words. You don’t have the right to mock and deride people for misplacing a coma. The free use of words, is not elitist and is not governed by you. To my recollection, I never voted for a “Word Sheriff.”

Many of you are English teachers, editors, or experts in the fields of writing. Do you write to me to help me construct my prose more effectively?

I think not.

I say that because, your letters are publicly posted and laced with sarcasm, derision and some of the rudest comments I’ve ever read. I am an expert in field of obesity and weight loss, yet, I don’t run up to you, or a stranger for that matter, when I see you in Wal-Mart buying cereal or donuts and yell, “Don’t eat that… you’re already FAT!”

Do I stand by the McDonald’s drive-through and criticize you for buying French fries?

No.

So why do you think you have the right to pedantically cast stones at my prose when I’ve never met you, and I have never solicited your advise? What gives you the right to whip out your sharpie and feel obligated to perform the equivalent of derisive graffiti on my prose? Your unsolicited public criticism of my “wordsmithing” is the equivalent of calling me “FAT” in public.

I see language like music, it has the ability to be modified, twisted and accented to tickle, tantalize and tease the reader by the creation of emotion. But you wouldn’t understand that, because you’re too busy worrying that my misuse of an apostrophe when I wrote “donuts” might cause a puppy to die.

If I turn a noun into a verb for the sake of fun, or to stir emotion, don’t have a conniption! Shakespeare is famous for this, he did it all the time. If you can’t hack it, then table my blog for another time when you have matured enough to chair your emotions. (See, it wasn’t that painful, was it?)

To be honest, I’m really uninterested in your opinions about my prose . . . or should I say disinterested just to piss you off?